Beth Adams

Beth Adams joined WXXI as host of Morning Edition in 2012 after a more than two decade radio career. She was the longtime host of the WHAM Morning News in Rochester, where she was recognized for her work by the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the New York State Humane Society. Her career also took her from radio stations in Elmira, New York to Miami, Florida.

Beth is active in the Rochester community, having volunteered for organizations including the Humane Society at Lollypop Farm, the Heart of Gold Children's Foundation, the Rochester Press Radio Club Children’s Charities, and the Rochester Broadway Theater League Education Committee.  She is an avid reader of historical fiction and a devoted animal lover. Beth is married to award-winning writer and author Scott Pitoniak. 

A relative shortage of homes for sale in the Rochester region has caused some prospective home buyers to put their search on hold.  Others find luck with persistence, though they sometimes get engaged in bidding wars and pay more than the asking price.

Some Rochester residents who dropped out of high school, served time in prison, or simply struggled with establishing a career, are learning the skills of the construction trade.

Andy Evans, a master builder with years of experience, is offering classes in a former church on Buffalo Road in Gates. Evans said someone once taught him how to do this work when he was younger.

"I was at a part of my life where I could have gone down the wrong road," he said.  Now, Evans wants to help young men who haven't found a good paying job or a career they like.

Increasing demand means another expansion for the Veterans Crisis Line (VCL). The Canandaigua-based facility is looking to hire another 30 to 50 people.

The job requires some specific skills. Responders take calls from veterans and active duty service members experiencing some of the most difficult struggles of their lives.

A team of students at RIT has come up with a new way to send out mass notifications on campus in the event of an emergency.

Their digital clock can receive digital alerts to display on the screen when emergency coordinators have to reach students, staff, and campus visitors in a hurry.

Tyler Krupicka is one of the computer engineering students who developed the prototype. He says the device, called Clockwyse, can be made using consumer tablets and PCs.  Mounted on the wall in a classroom or common area, it simply displays the time, until there's an emergency.

Current U.S. immigration policies pose an economic threat to New York's struggling dairy industry, according to the director of a farmworker program at Cornell University.

Mary Jo Dudley made that observation following the recent arrest of an undocumented immigrant worker on a central New York dairy farm. 

Dudley says the gridlock over immigration reform in Washington puts further stresses on New York dairy farmers whose milk production costs are higher than the federally controlled price.

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