Daniel Robison, WBFO

@RobisonRobison

WBFO/Western New York reporter for the Innovation Trail.

Daniel Robison came to Buffalo from WFIU in Bloomington, Indiana, where he was assistant news director.  Robison has contributed to NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition SundayOn Point with Tom Ashbrook, PRI's The WorldVoice of America, Chicago Public MediaWNYC, the Ohio River Radio Consortium, Allegheny Front and assisted APM's The Story and Marketplace.

Robison has an M.A. from Indiana University and graduated in 2007 with a degree in history from the University of Evansville.  

Robison hails from Kentuckiana (the Indiana side!), better known as the Louisville Metro Area. You can follow him at @robisonrobison

Ways to Connect

Old Shoe Woman / via Flickr

Someone once said Thursday is the new Friday. Whatever that means, here's the Morning Trail Mix from the trusty team of the Innovation Trail.

Tax breaks for craft brewers are now law.

Ralph Wilson Stadium gets a Lego doppelganger. 

And: A transparent political strategy on display in western New York.

Daniel Robison / WBFO

With China largely cornering the market for rare earth metals, domestic researchers are trying to create synthetic replacements.

SUNY Buffalo (UB) wants to corner that effort – and is asking the federal government for $120 million to help.

chapstickaddict / via Flickr

Strap on the boots and tie them tight; you're going for a hike on the Innovation Trail.

Today we find out what a "nurdle" is. Wait, you don't know?

Prepare to pay more tolls on the Thruway - if you're a trucker.

And: Buffalo's downtown gets some help from a large corporation.

Daniel Robison / WBFO

Until now, scientists could only guess at the amount of plastic waste in the Great Lakes.

This week, a team of researchers sets sail to conduct the first-ever survey of plastic pollution in the world’s largest fresh water system.

“You really have to start with, ‘Is this even an issue in the Great Lakes?  [With] 35 million people living around the Great Lakes, all the plastic you see blowing around, common sense is that it’s out there,” says Sherri “Sam” Mason, professor within SUNY Fredonia’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Courtesy photo / Sensorcon

Are we on the verge of a “sensor revolution?”

Sensorcon hopes so. The Buffalo-based tech startup envisions a world where the average person is empowered with a small device that reads temperature, carbon monoxide levels, dew point and more.

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