Veronica Volk

Veronica Volk is a Reporter/Producer for WXXI News.  She comes from WFUV Public Radio, where she began her broadcasting career as a reporter covering the Bronx, and the greater New York City area. She later became the Senior Producer of WFUV’s weekly public affairs show, Cityscape.
 
Originally from Ocean County, New Jersey, Veronica got her B.A. in Communication and Media Studies at Fordham University, concentrating on Media, Culture, and Society.
 

The International Joint Commission, the bi-national group that helps to oversee the Great Lakes, held two public meetings in Buffalo on Tuesday – and more than 200 people showed up to share their concerns.


Every year, hundreds of commercial ships make their way through the St. Lawrence seaway, taking on and letting out water to maintain stability as they load and unload cargo. This ballast water is regulated to prevent the spread of invasive species, but there is some disagreement about who should be in charge of those regulations.

Plastic debris is pervasive in the waters that feed the Great Lakes, according to a new study published by the United States Geological Survey.

The study found widespread microplastics in 29 tributaries, with the highest concentrations in the Huron River at Ann Arbor, Mich., and the Buffalo River at Buffalo, N.Y.

Microplastics are fibers and beads that come from decomposing bottles and bags, clothing, and even some cosmetic products.

Farmers helping to limit algae in Great Lakes

Jul 5, 2016

Summers along the Great Lakes include fishing, boating -- and dangerous algae blooms that can shut down beaches. These blooms are caused by excess phosphorous, a lot of which comes from farms. Now some of the region's farmers are testing agricultural practices that could reduce harmful runoff.

Duane Stateler and his son Anthony run Stateler Family Farms, one of a handful of demonstrations farms across the country. Over the next five years, three farms in Northwest Ohio will test different practices to find out what reduces phosphorus runoff.

RIT has officially opened the new headquarters for their small business incubator, and public officials have high hopes for the center.

Ebony Miller is the interim director for RIT's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship, or CUE, and she says her favorite part of the job is:

"...knowing that I'm helping a person realize their dreams and being able to achieve them."

It's a job she'll now be doing at the new headquarters for CUE at the old Rochester Savings Bank on Franklin Street, a renovation project more than three years in the making.

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