Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief, New York State Public Radio

Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio.

Karen DeWitt reports for a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990. 

She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York NOW. She appears on the reporter's roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women's Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Ways to Connect

The New York State Legislature completed work on the state budget around 7:30 a.m. Monday, after pulling an all-night session to complete  the  budget relatively on time. The spending plan represents a compromise where not everyone is completely happy.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pleased with the results of the spending plan.

“This is probably the broadest, most sweeping state plan that we have done,” Cuomo said. “There are a number of national firsts.”

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, in remarks early Monday, had a diffrent asessment.

A report in the Washington Post says Amazon is considering pulling out of a deal to build its New York City headquarters because of opposition from state and city elected officials who represent the Queens district where the company wants to build.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is enjoying solid support from the leaders of most of the major unions in New York as he runs for a third term in office. But Cuomo’s relationship with organized labor was not always so sunny.

Cuomo’s frequent appearances with union leaders in recent months have included lavish praise on both sides.

Mario Cilento, head of the state’s AFL-CIO, which has 2.5 million members, spoke at an event with Cuomo in the spring.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s economic development programs have been the subject of two federal corruption trials that ended with convictions for two of Cuomo’s former associates.

But some say problems with the $9 billion programs go beyond corruption and that the structure of the programs is flawed.

The Working Families Party split up over the weekend, with some of the last remaining major unions leaving the group. The progressive political party announced it is backing Cynthia Nixon for governor, while Gov. Andrew Cuomo withdrew from consideration, saying he’s sticking with the major unions, for now.

The choice seems a safe bet for the incumbent governor.

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